The Miami Valley School Library

What is the civil rights movement? / by Sherri L. Smith ; illustrated by Tim Foley.

By: Smith, Sherri L [author.]Contributor(s): Foley, Tim, 1962- [illustrator.]Material type: TextTextDescription: pages cmISBN: 9781524792312; 9781524792305Subject(s): Civil rights movements -- United States -- History -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil rights -- History -- Juvenile literature | African Americans -- Civil Rights -- History | Civil rights demonstrations -- United States -- HistoryDDC classification: 323.119 SMI LOC classification: E185.61 | .S6555 2020
Contents:
What is the civil rights movement? -- A troubled past -- The long walk to school -- Montgomery bus boycott -- The lunch counter sit-ins -- Freedom riders -- The children's crusade -- The march on Washington -- Freedom summer -- Selma to Montgomery -- Changing times -- Timelines.
Summary: "Even though slavery had ended in the 1860s, African Americans were still suffering under the weight of segregation a hundred years later. They couldn't go to the same schools, eat at the same restaurants, or even use the same bathrooms as white people. But by the 1950s, black people refused to remain second-class citizens and were willing to risk their lives to make a change"--
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G- Nonfiction (Juvenile) 323.119 SMI (Browse shelf) Available 4007797

Includes bibliographical references.

What is the civil rights movement? -- A troubled past -- The long walk to school -- Montgomery bus boycott -- The lunch counter sit-ins -- Freedom riders -- The children's crusade -- The march on Washington -- Freedom summer -- Selma to Montgomery -- Changing times -- Timelines.

"Even though slavery had ended in the 1860s, African Americans were still suffering under the weight of segregation a hundred years later. They couldn't go to the same schools, eat at the same restaurants, or even use the same bathrooms as white people. But by the 1950s, black people refused to remain second-class citizens and were willing to risk their lives to make a change"--

Ages: 8-12 Penguin Workshop

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